Home
  Message Board
  Atari Systems
  Game Scores
  Video Reviews
  Bonus Material
  Join TAT!
  Contact

Username:
Password:
 
 

The Atari Times Interactive

 

The Place for Atari!


Preserving arcade history by 2015-02-05 13:18:33


Houston, TX

Bug Smasher
125 Posts
A few months ago I mentioned on my forums a bummer of a thought of there being tons of arcades, whether they were small, huge, or somewhere in between all over the world that closed decades ago, yet you look around the internet and you can't find anything about them. Nothing. Squat. Period. They're gone forever. Maybe some of the absolutely huge ones (100 or more games) and/or chains will have a tiny bit on Wikipedia/possibly they'll get a mention in someone's gaming blog somewhere, but other than that and my friend JammaJup only listing arcades in two counties in the U. K., which, even though he got in several dozen, that's still not a worldwide catalog of arcades or anything.

I looked around and couldn't even find a wiki for such a thing, so I posted about it on my forums, which, even though people said it was a good idea, no one took up the hint that if they'd just START one I could add in a bit, so I did just that (even though I really don't need a FOURTH blasted wiki)

http://arcadepreservation.wikia.com/wiki/Arcadepreservation_Wiki

As the How to write an article page explains and as how you can just look at pretty much any page on there to see what kind of format I'm looking for, the first time an arcade's name is mentioned in the article, it's to be in bold, game titles are to be italicized, etc. It explains everything, although a quick summary in the intro sums it up pretty much, as it may come across sounding more complicated than it actually is, but then, you can just open up editing from a page like this,

Town and Country 6

copy and paste everything from it onto a new page and change info as needed (/take out the Background if you don't think it needs one, change the name of the arcade, games, categories at the bottom, etc.). Plus it also has a generic placeholder graphic in the infobox for an arcade that could have closed down decades ago that you probably won't have any pictures of, unfortunately, but at least that's all done already.

 
re: Preserving arcade history by 2017-05-08 11:41:16


Cambridge, UK

Saboteur
8 Posts
I like this as an idea. It's hard to know where you'd go these days to play old arcade games. I'm not talking about MAME or web versions - I mean actual hardware.

There are a few arcade games in the Centre For Computing History in Cambridge, although it's much more focussed towards computers and consoles. Although you have to pay to get in, once you are in there everything is free to use.

Other than that you often find newer arcade games in with 10 pin bowling and the like, but not much else. I can't remember the last time I saw an amusement arcade in the classic 1980s sense. Plenty of places with fruit machines but that's usually it, and I'm not really into them.
 
re: Preserving arcade history by 2017-05-19 14:50:46


Houston, TX

Bug Smasher
125 Posts
Quote:
I like this as an idea.


Thanks! Feel free to add any to the site if you wish, although the computing place sounds like it's more of a museum, which isn't allowed at the wiki, unfortunately. Bowling alley arcades and the like are fine though.

Quote:
It's hard to know where you'd go these days to play old arcade games. I'm not talking about MAME or web versions - I mean actual hardware.


Unfortunately that's the price we pay with the advancing of technology

Quote:

There are a few arcade games in the Centre For Computing History in Cambridge, although it's much more focussed towards computers and consoles. Although you have to pay to get in, once you are in there everything is free to use.


Still looks nice though

Quote:

Other than that you often find newer arcade games in with 10 pin bowling and the like, but not much else. I can't remember the last time I saw an amusement arcade in the classic 1980s sense. Plenty of places with fruit machines but that's usually it, and I'm not really into them.


I'm not really into the newer stuff either, but that should be no surprise with me being on this site, along with running mine!



Vector gaming forums
 



Reply

Name:

Subject:

re: Preserving arcade history

Message:

Code:

        

Emotes:

                 

Enter Code Above:





Note: Inappropriate, vulgar, or SPAM comments will be deleted and you will be banned.